Tag: atlanta ga

Elements of Art Worksheet Pack + TPT Sale

For the last three years, my best seller on my Teachers Pay Teachers website has been my hand drawn elements of art worksheet pack. I spent the summer of 2014 drawing out my elements of art, principles of design, and visual journal how to worksheets. I carefully drew them in pencil, spell checked, had my husband spell check, and finally traced over everything in sharpie. Next, everything was scanned in, edited, and uploaded to my store. Hours went into that product, but it has certainly paid off.

I have gotten a lot of great feedback and constructive criticism on my product. The biggest issue that has come up over the years is the legibility of my sheets. For the most part, they are fairly clear, but there are a few spots where text is squeezed in. In addition, students these days are more used to reading text off a screen than handwriting on a sheet of paper.

While I enjoy the handmade aspect of these products, I decided it was time to bring them up to the modern era. Over Christmas break I began digitally redesigning all of my element of art worksheets. This task proved more difficult than I expected. I not only wanted to give it a more legible look, but I also wanted to maintain a modern feel, and provide new information. For example, if my customers wanted to review the elements of art in their painting class, they could get an entire new set of worksheets to use in their classroom. I thought this would be fairly easy, but there is only so many ways you can explain value.

Once again hours were spent creating these new products, and finally, last night I uploaded the compilation pack of the seven worksheets. I love the new look and I am proud of the fact that the information was presented in a new way. A lot of the same things are covered, but with different explanations, examples, and applications. 

Like my original set, this pack includes the elements of art: color, line, shape, form, texture, value, and space. Each worksheet includes a color and black and white version of the front, and a back that tests the students’ understanding of the information on the front. These are great activities to get the students thinking about the elements and putting information to practice before final projects.

In addition to finally finished my updated elements of art worksheets, I am participating in the Teachers Pay Teachers end of school year sale. My entire store will be 20% off tomorrow (5/9/17) through Wednesday (5/10/17). That puts this pack at just $8.00.

If you haven’t checked out Teachers Pay Teachers yet, give it a try. There is nothing better than finding great resources for your classroom and supporting your fellow educators at the same time. The majority of my profits from my store go straight to my pocket, TPT only takes a small percentage, making all my time and effort well worth it.

We are almost there, summer is just around the corner.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about art education, teachers pay teachers, visual journaling, and crafting in general by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by.


 

Visual Journal Page 20: Breathe In, Breathe Out

There are many nights I lay in bed, my body exhausted, eyes heavy, and mind racing. The endless to do list scrolls through, the what did I forgets start haunting, the stress from the day just can’t seem to find a way to subside.

When I first started teaching I had many restless nights. Fear kept me awake. Fear of what the next day would bring. Fear of sleeping in. Fear of not being prepared. Fear of forgetting something. Fear of failure. Fear of my students. Many days I felt like a hoax. I had no idea what I was doing. That year, everyday was the first day for me.

My first year anxieties lessened with each passing year. I learned a lot, found projects that were reliable, and developed systems for handling my students. As my stress levels were reduced, my nights of sleep got better. However, I would still periodically have those moments where I would lay in bed, stuck in limbo, unable to pass into sleep or wake up enough to do something else. In those moments I fall back on my old restless night strategies. I would lay still and focus on my lungs. As I would breathe in I would feel my lungs expand to capacity. I would imagine the folds filling out and pressing into my other organs as they expanded. I would breathe out. My lungs would slowly collapse pushing all air out, until they were tiny, limp, and deflated. I would repeat this until I finally drifted beyond the middle into sleep.

This method has helped me through many of my most restless nights. It’s my off button for my brain. A simple strategy to put focus on my most basic body function, breathe in… breathe out…

SUPPLIES

  • Visual journal
  • Scissors
  • Rubber cement
  • Black bleeding tissue paper
  • Gesso
  • Paint brush
  • Water
  • Sharpie
  • Old book pages

HOW TO

This is one of those visual journal pages that was fairly simple to create, but had a lot of impact once it was finished. It was also one of those pages that I visualized in my head before starting and it came out just as I expected, if not better, which rarely happens.

I knew I wanted to create an image of a lung. I started this journal page by looking up medical drawings of lungs to reference. I wanted to make sure it was accurate. Once I settled on an image I began thinking about the look. I had recently completed a page about a black widow (check it out here) where I used black bleeding tissue paper and gesso. I loved the look the wet gesso created on the paper. A red hue would bleed into the white gesso from the black tissue paper. I decided this would be a good material to use for this visual journal page as well.

Once I had my image, a sheet of black tissue paper, paintbrush, and gesso, I was ready. I freehanded the painting of the lungs. I started with a loose outline of the shape and went into the bigger sections first, which was the white block in the heart that expanded to the veins in the lungs. I carefully planned around sections that needed to stay black and moved from one area to the next. For the arteries of the heart I used curved lines to show the shape and to give it texture to separate it from everything else. I liked the look of the lines and decided to carry them into the spaces between the veins in the lungs to fill out the shape. I mimicked the circular tissue pattern from the original image into my painting as I moved to the bottom of the lungs. To define the esophagus I used short, hatch lines, that also curved along the contour of the shape. I decided to make it longer than I needed, just to make sure it filled the page.

As I painted each section, the color from the bleeding tissue paper would bleed into the white. I loved the look it created, it added much more interest to the color than a stark white. Once the painting was dry, I cut the shape out of the rectangular bleeding tissue paper sheet. I carefully glued it into my visual journal using rubber cement and trimmed off the excess esophagus.

I overlapped sheets of old and discolored book pages to the top with ripped out pieces of black bleeding tissue paper on top. This tied the top section to my lungs visually, while also giving me a space to write words. Even with the detailed painting, I still felt the background was lacking. I decided to cut out rounded shapes from the book pages to mimic the shape of the lungs and create a sense of movement. I glued them into the background, which helped further tie the book pages into the entire piece.

Last, but not least, I used gesso to paint the words “breathe in… breathe out…” over the ripped up tissue paper. In the sections where the words extended beyond the bleeding tissue paper, I went over the letters with black sharpie to help them stand out.

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page about your method to falling asleep.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about visual journals by following and sharing with others on your social media site of choice. Thanks for stopping by!


 

Encaustic Art: A 36″x60″ Commission

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I created this 12″x24″ boat encaustic a few years back. It was one of the first that I tried carving into the layers of melted and hardened wax to pull out an image. I loved how the boat blended into the background yet popped against the colored wax painted around it. This piece has traveled with me to many art shows and is my most favorited piece on my Etsy shop.

In the spring I was contacted through Etsy by a woman interested in the piece. We went back and forth on price negotiations, and I thought the day had come for me to part with my little boat. I was very surprised when Amber wrote me again requesting quotes for a larger version of the piece. I was intrigued by the prospect, I always love a challenge, and it would be interesting to see how it would translate on a larger scale. I sent back a range of prices and sizes, with the largest size at 36″x60.” When setting up commissions I always assume the buyer will fall somewhere in the middle, so I was surprised when Amber jumped on the 36″x60″ size. I was thrilled at first, then slightly scared. Encaustic can be a difficult medium to work with, especially on a large scale, and this was by far the largest size I had ever tackled. But once the wood panel arrived, I was ready to go.

Layer 1

I started with a bare wood panel. When working with encaustic you must work on a rigid surface, such as wood, to prevent the wax from flexing and inevitably cracking. The first step was to coat the entire panel in layers of blue wax and fuse the layers by heating it up with a heat gun.

Layer 2

Once the panel had a good base layer I covered up the blue with thin, art paper. While it is shocking see all the beautiful blue covered up, once I add and fuse another layer of wax the paper ends up being absorbed into the wax and showing a lot of the layer below.

Layer 3

After the paper was attached I added a thick coat of encaustic medium, a clear wax. This was by far the most challenging step of the process. With every new layer I painted on, I had to fuse it with the layers beneath, while making sure air bubbles were smoothed out. The difficult part of working so large is the wax hardens fairly quickly. I would heat one section, move to another, and before I could get the two sections to blend together one would already be hard. It took many layers and a lot of fusing in order to get a solid, smooth layer.

After the encaustic medium was added I loosely painted natural white wax on top and fused it to create a smokey, hazy layer.

Layer 4

While it was still difficult to get a smooth, even look, it was much easier to work with the white since I had well fused and smooth layers beneath.

Layer 4 detail

Once I was satisfied with the general look of the background I carved the boat shape into the layers of wax using a pointy tool that I scavenged from by hub’s tool box. I lightly marked out the shape before carving in the final lines. If I messed up it meant melting and re-smoothing the entire piece. I then pushed Payne’s Gray oil paint into the lines to make them pop.

Boat Progression

Once the white wax was melted into the piece I painted a repeating diamond pattern in the background using oil paint. It added another interesting layer and helped tie the layers together in the background.

After adding the diamond pattern I added the layers of blue to create the water beneath the boat and the layers of white and yellow to create the sky. I loved how immediately the boat popped. At this point Amber and I were e-mailing daily, hourly, as I worked on the final touches. I would send images, she would send feedback, and the piece was tweaked. While it is important for my vision to come across I think it’s just as important for the commissioner’s vision to also be represented. I love working with my clients to get their work of art just right.

Layer 7

I was so happy with the final product and felt incredibly accomplished to have finished such a large piece.

Finished Product

I loved both the similarities and differences between the mini and the macro versions of my boat. It was fun comparing them before the commissioned piece was packed up and shipped out.

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I was terrified as I packed it in many layers of foam and bubble wrap to be shipped from my little Atlanta, GA bungalow to the other corner of the United States, Seattle, WA. I eagerly awaited Amber’s reply when she received the piece. It is a very different experience seeing an encaustic in person. The layered look isn’t done justice through pictures, and I could only hoped she liked it in person as much as she did through the many photographs she had seen.

Encaustic Reveal

Amber was sweet enough to not only let me know when she received the piece, but she also photographed the process of she and her kids opening it up. I felt like I was there during the big reveal.

Hanging on the Wall

In addition to commissioning an almost 3x larger version of the original, Amber ended up also buying the original to give as a gift to a friend. I love that both my boats live near each other on the pacific coast.

I loved every minute of working with Amber and creating this work of art. She gave me the opportunity to put my encaustic abilities to the test, work larger than I ever had before, and see how one of my smaller pieces would translate to a large size. I hope for many more opportunities like this in the future.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the work about all things art, encaustic, and made in the south by sharing on your social network site of choice. I would love to hear your comments about this piece and encaustics in general! Comment below or e-mail me at whitneywpanetta@gmail.com


 

Craft Fairs: Setting Up My Outdoor Booth

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After a year of collecting the necessary parts, I finally set up my outdoor booth.

On a very hot day in March, I spent a day in pursuit of a booth picture. My hubby and I spent the afternoon pulling out my tent, grid panels, “S” hooks, tables, decor, and of course, artwork. I loved watching all the pieces finally come together.

After three years of dabbling in indoor art shows I decided I wanted to expand to outdoor shows. They are more frequent and have a lot more foot traffic than the indoor exhibits. After finally deciding it was time to make the transition, I began looking for shows to apply for. Every single one required a picture of the booth set up in order to apply. This wasn’t something I was going to be able to submit, and see what happens. I was going to have to invest a lot of up front money in the hopes of being accepted to a show.

Over the next year I spent hours on Craigslist, garage sale and discount websites. Slowly, but surely, the components came together. The tent came first, I finally gave in and bought one new. A few months after the tent was purchased a coworker contacted me about selling his booth parts. He tried selling his artwork for a year before deciding it just wasn’t for him. I was able to get six grid panels and weights from him. I then pulled tables from my indoor set up, two of the three panels I use to display work at indoor shows, and hanging supplies.

After getting all the pieces it still took months for me to work up the motivation to set it up. For hours I was running in and out of my house hauling artwork. I quickly realized I would never be able to do this solo. The tent is too cumbersome and the panels are too heavy. My first lesson in outdoor festival participation is making sure Nick is always available for set up and break down.

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I decided I wanted my largest pieces along the back wall. They helped fill the space, and would hopefully catch the eye of passerbys. The trickiest part I have to figure out is where to set myself up. I enjoy having a table to hide behind. I am a passive seller. Perhaps I would earn more money if I pushed my products on people, but I want them to purchase one of my pieces because they feel connected to it. My tiny little table is my comfort zone. My safety net, preventing me from getting my hopes up as people come in and peruse my work.

DSC_3750 I decided to hang my letter pieces on the right side panel, and my 6″x6″ silhouette paintings on the left side panel. My hope is these pieces will be more approachable as people walk by. They may assume the large pieces are out of their price range, but with $35 and $25 price tags, these are easy to pick up and take home.

I also wanted to set up a table with my letter prints, at $10 each these are an even better impulse buy item. I decided these would be best set up next to my letter encaustics and extending slightly out of my booth to break up the space.

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One issue that always lurked in the back of my mind was how my encaustics would stand up to summer Georgia heat. I got a little taste of it during the practice set up, the pieces that were directly in the sun began to melt. It was worse case scenario. After all the time and work I put into my set up, I was now questioning whether or not I was even going to be able to do this at all.

As soon as I discovered the melting pieces, I snapped my pictures, and began disassembling. As I carefully took each piece down, I examined it for signs of tackiness and liquid wax. Luckily, only the pieces in direct sunlight showed signs of the wax turning to liquid. The pieces with the sun hitting the backside of them felt slightly tacky and the rest of the pieces were fine. Although I felt a little better, I was still concerned. These were only up for 30 minutes, an hour at the most, what would happen at an all day festival?

After cleaning up I began doing some research. There are brave artists out there who display their encaustic in the dead of summer at outdoor festivals. You do have to play a game of rearranging as the sun enters your tent, but it gave me hope. A lot of the sunlight was coming in through the sides of the tent, but at a festival, in theory, there will be tents on either side. I decided I just needed to give it a shot, and I applied for my first show. The Chastain Park Arts Festival, opening the first weekend of May.

6%22x6%22 Oil Painting Studies

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To ease my mind even more, I have begun mini oil paintings. These will hang in the sunlight when my encaustics have to be moved. I am ready to expand my art career, and this is the next logical step. I will not let a melting work of art get in my way.

Today I find out whether or not I have been accepted to the Chastain festival. Whether or not I make it, I have a long list of other festivals to apply to. Hopefully I will soon have an opportunity to take my booth set up out for the real deal. Stay tuned!

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about my artwork by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by!


 

Visual Journal Page 18: Printing

Visual Journal Page 18-Printing

For over two years I functioned without a printer in my classroom. In my class visual journals are a big focus. Every Friday my students get out their journals and make whatever they want. With this open ended assignment also comes a need to print images for my students to use in their visual journals. In addition to my weekly need for a printer, my students often used images as references for their projects. At the start of every project I had to reserve time in the only computer lab in the school just so my students had access to a computer to look up images and a printer to print them.

For living in such a technically advanced age it shocks me when schools are so far behind. We are supposed to be preparing these students for college and the workforce. Technology is an inevitable part of their futures and they need experience using it before they get there. Many of my students were fortunate enough to live in homes that could afford computers. However not all of my students are that lucky. Some of their only contact with technology was in school, and we had low availability of it.

By my third year I was fed up. I was tired of battling every other teacher for time in the computer lab and sending students to the library to print for 25 cents a page. It was time to find a way to get technology in my classroom. I decided to apply to a grant program in Newton County called the Snapping Shoals Bright Ideas grant, provided by Snapping Shoals Electric Membership Corporation. To apply to the grant I had to provide a lesson plan and what materials needed funding for the lesson. I chose to submit a lesson for my Advanced Placement Art class that involved photo transfers. In order to print pictures to transfer they needed a computer and a laser printer.

The previous year I had applied to Snapping Shoals and was awarded grant money to help fund my sculpture program. I was one of 19 teachers selected to received funding from the surrounding counties. I was proud of myself and excited for the prospects this provided for my students. Because I was awarded money the previous year, I figured my chances were slim of being selected again. Despite this I put together my lesson and submitted my application.

The announcement day came and I couldn’t believe it when I found my name on the list. I was going to receive two computers and a printer for my students to use. I would finally have a space to allow my students to expand their ideas and create their projects.

SUPPLIES

  • Visual journal
  • Elmer’s glue
  • Scissors
  • Laser printed image
  • Packaging tape
  • Book pages
  • Sharpie

HOW TO

To create this visual journal page I started with a print out of the most colorful, vibrant picture I could find. I wanted to show off my printer’s ability, and loved this picture of the brightly colored pots. I printed it off on my fancy new laser printer and got to work creating a tape transfer. I carefully placed packaging tape over the picture, sticky side down, on top of the front of the image. After I had one layer of tape covering the picture, I trimmed off the white edges, leaving just the picture stuck to the tape. I rubbed the back of the picture with scissor handles (burnishing) to ensure the ink was well stuck to the tape. I then placed the image in water until the paper began separating from the tape. I carefully rubbed the paper away, leaving just the ink stuck to the tape and creating a semi-transparent image.

I wanted to emphasize my ability to now create image transfers easily (thanks to my new computers and printer) so I also layered tape transfers of text in the background. To create these all I did was lightly stick packaging tape on a book page, then ripped it off, so the ink from the text stuck to the tape without too much of the paper sticking. I layered these in the background, the stickiness of the tape was enough to adhere it to the page.

Because the tape transfer of the image was very ink heavy, the tape lost its stickiness. In order to adhere it to the page I had to glue it down with Elmer’s glue. Do not use rubber cement when layering tape, it creates a chemical reaction and makes the tape bubble. I wanted to emphasize the image even more, so I cut a paper frame out of a book page to outline it.

To complete the page I layered two pieces of book pages on the right page, then wrote “printing” on top with sharpie.

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page using the two types of tape transfers I used. One where you layer tape on a laser printed image and wash off the paper. The second should be a quick transfer of text by lightly sticking packaging tape to a book page or newspaper and ripping it off.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about visual journaling by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by!