Tag: teachers pay teachers

Visual Journal Page 22: The Fall & Visual Journal Page 23: Ouch

This visual journal page was created to represent my clumsiness. Not only am I clumsy, but I also bruise easily, which means I am in a constant state of being covered with bumps, scratches, and lovely shades of purples, yellows, and blues. I don’t think I ever quite grew into myself, my limbs still feel like they are longer than they should be.

Specifically, this page is meant to represent a particular incident of clumsiness, a tumble down the stairs. When I move from point a to point b my goal is to move as quickly as possible without breaking into a run. My fast walking combined with my long legs makes it look like I’m always in a rush. The same is applied when I am going up and down stairs. I don’t take them one at a time, carefully watching my step, I generally jog up and jog down. I blame my need for speed on my father who was the type to wait in the car, with the car running, until everyone finally piled in to leave. I always felt rushed, and that has continued into my adult life.

95% of the time my jog up, jog down stair taking is successful. However, the remaining 5% of the time means I miss a step or slip on a step either falling up, or falling down the stairs. On this particular day I hit a step heading down, my foot slipped out from under me, and down I went.

Unfortunately, the slip happened towards the top of the stairs, so I had a long way to go to reach the bottom. It felt like a cartoon, my butt hit the next step, and there was no going back. I literally slide down the stairs until something stopped by downward fall, which happened to be the side table next to my front door.

My next visual journal page represents my husband’s point of view. He was sitting on our sofa, watching TV, minding his own business, when all of the sudden I came tumbling down. All he heard was bam, bam, bam, bam, as my various body parts hit step after step, followed by a final smash as I collided with our red side table. The commotion was followed by back and forth rock of the table as it tried to rebalance after my collision.

I had to lay there for just a minute to allow my brain to catch up to the events and my body to recover. My big toe made contact with the table first, and absorbed the weight that followed behind it. It caused a bruised toe and cracked nail. My right arm made the first, and only, attempt, and fail, to break my fall and stop the ensuing events. That resulted in a big bruise on my forearm. After the tumble and a moment of recovery, I couldn’t help but laugh at myself. I could be so careless and I had no one to blame but myself.

Despite the sequence of events you can still find me jogging up and down stairs and falling 5% of the time.

SUPPLIES

  • Visual Journal
  • Rubber cement
  • Pencil
  • Gesso
  • Paint brush
  • Water
  • Charcoal
  • Charcoal pencil
  • Pastels
  • Red acrylic paint
  • Book Pages
  • Laser printed images of table
  • Packaging tape
  • Scissors
  • Sharpie

HOW TO

To create these two visual journal pages I wanted to create two very different looks. I wanted the actual fall to look dark and more serious. For the aftermath, I wanted it to look as silly as I felt. I started with the fall page and decided early on to shade on top of a gesso base. Since gesso is a wet material, I opted to rip two pages from my book so I could work on them without the risk of the gesso bleeding through to other pages.

I sketched out the design first using pencil. My staircase at home is simple and straight, but I wanted to create a more dramatic effect so I opted to exaggerate the style. I sketched out the twisting staircase, and centered the final set of stairs between the two pages. To the left of the stairs I drew out my right hand and right foot, to show my injuries. Once I had the base sketches ready, I added water to my gesso, to make it more transparent, and filled in the shapes.

Once the gesso dried I began pulling out details using the charcoal pencil. I added purple and brown pastels to create shadows on the stairs and the bruise on my arm and toe. I added black charcoal around the staircase to make it pop. To create a blended look with the charcoal I colored more heavily at the edge of the stairs, then used my finger and a paper towel to blend the charcoal away from the steps and into the background. I continued to build up details with the charcoal pencil and push my shadows with the pastel and black charcoal.

Once I finished shading I painted my toe nails bright red using red acrylic paint. I liked the sudden pop of color and it created a great attention grabber. I used a thin brush and gesso to add the crack in my toenail.

Once the page was finished I sprayed it with fixative, to prevent the charcoal from smudging, and glued it on top of pages still attached in my visual journal book.

For the second page I wanted a more playful look and I wanted to create a sense of movement in the table. I decided to create 5 packaging tape transfers of the same image of my side table, then overlap them to make it look like it was moving. To do this, I printed 5 copies of the table on a laser printer. I taped clear packaging tape to the front of the pictures, then cut out the table. I then ran the cut outs under water until the paper started to separate from the tape. I carefully rubbed the paper off using my fingertips until only the ink from the printed image was left on the tape. I dried it off using paper towels and set them aside.

I decided to use book pages from two different books to create a space for the table to sit in. I used the lighter, wider book pages first and glued them to the center of my visual journal page using rubber cement. I then layered two smaller, darker book pages in the center of the ones I just glued and also glued them down with rubber cement. Next, I placed my table packaging tape image transfers on the right side of the book spread. I used Elmer’s glue to glue them in place, the chemicals in rubber cement will cause the tape to ripple.

Next, I decided to add another thin bar of the light and dark book pages to the top and write “bam, bam, bam” in Sharpie across it. To balance the layout I added one small section of layered book pages to the right page below the table and wrote “ouch” in black Sharpie.

CHALLENGE

Create a visual journal page about an unfortunate accident.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about visual journals and art in general by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by!

Teachers Pay Teachers: Semester Long Painting Curriculum and Yearlong Advanced Art Curriculum

I have been posting a lot about Teachers Pay Teachers lately, but lately TPT has been my life. For another summer in a row, I have spent all summer planning, typing, and compiling lesson plans, PowerPoints, worksheets, and resources into new TPT products. Last year, my August and September earnings funded a ten day trip that took my hubs and I to Munich, Berlin, and Amsterdam. This year, my August earnings have more than doubled, and my hard earned money is being put into our front yard landscaping, replacing molding around windows, and repairing our roof. Although these are less fun items than a European vacation, they are all in preparation for our next bundle of joy, baby girl Panetta, due November 27th. These things have all been possible because I decided to start putting a few of my lesson plans on a teaching website.


One major goal I have for myself is to create an entire high school art (adaptable to middle school art) curriculum. This would include yearlong and semester long curriculums for Introduction to Art, Painting, Drawing, Advanced 2D Design, Introduction to Sculpture and Ceramics, Sculpture and Ceramics II, Advanced 3D Design, and Advanced Placement Art. Last summer, I compiled my yearlong and semester long lessons for Introduction to Art. It has been my biggest seller the last year. This summer I was able to compile my semester long painting curriculum and my advanced 2D art (which is also adaptable for AP Art breadth) curriculums. They are both doing well, and I am getting a lot of great feedback. I am halfway through my Introduction to Sculpture and Ceramics curriculum, and can’t wait to tie everything up in a nice bow and get it posted to my Teachers Pay Teachers store. I hope by this time next year my high school art curriculum will be complete, and I will be onto my next TPT task.

My painting curriculum includes:

-Semester long timeline
-Supply list
-Syllabus
-Get to Know you handout
-10 student handouts
-1 teacher aid handouts
-2 technology tie activities
-9 lesson plans
-12 PowerPoints
-6 rubrics
-5 grading checklists
-5 critique sheets

The lessons cover the three main types of paint: watercolor, acrylic, and oil (oil can be substituted for art teachers on a budget), as well as mixed media with the visual journal project I incorporate in every class.

With this curriculum students create a sketchbook, full of painting techniques, testers, and reference material, as well as 5 take home level paintings, and a visual journal book. With every curriculum bundle I include a timeline, so you know what to teach when and how long it will take, as well as a supply list.

My Advanced 2D Design art curriculum includes:

In all this art unit includes:
-Course Syllabus
-Tell Me About You worksheet
-Yearlong timeline
-Supply list for all 14 projects
-2017 August-December calendar for AP breadth adaption
-14 completed projects
-10 Lesson plans
-9 PowerPoints
-4 handouts
-2 printable posters
-9 sketchbook handouts
-8 critique sheets
-10 project rubrics

This class is a full year course and is the last art class before students take Advanced Placement (AP) Art. It helps prepare them for the rigor of AP and they create work that is AP quality they can use in their portfolio. They create artwork using a range of materials: pencil, charcoal, watercolor, acrylic paint, oil paint, and mixed media, and participate in many group discussion and critiques. This curriculum also includes a timeline to adapt this to a semester long course, to fulfill the AP Art breadth section of the portfolio. I also have a printable 2017-2018 calendar as a resources for AP Art students.

I am really proud of all the work I have put into my TPT store, and even more proud when my work literally pays off. I you haven’t yet, check out all the amazing things TPT sellers have to offer! Support a fellow educator and get so many great resources for your classroom.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about art, TPT, crafting, and all things creating on your preferred social media site. Thanks for stopping by!


 

Teachers Pay Teachers: Principles of Design Worksheet Pack

So far this summer I have enjoyed a break from my normal teaching schedule, a trip to South Africa, Hilton Head Island, Smith Lake, and I’ve been getting extra snuggles from my little man Cooper. In addition to traveling and snuggling, I have also been working hard to get new items posted on Teachers Pay Teachers. Last year my August and September earnings from the website funded a trip to Europe for my husband and I. This year, and for the foreseeable future, I hope to save my earnings for a home renovation. It’s a big goal I have set for myself, but I am confident with a lot of hard work I can get there.

My last post, over two months ago {whoops} focused on one of my newest Teacher Pay Teacher products, a revamp of my hand drawn elements of art worksheets. Today, I finally got my final worksheet of my principles of design pack added to the website. Check it out here.

This pack includes eight worksheets. Each worksheet focuses on a different principle of design. I created worksheets for balance, emphasis, movement, proportion, repetition and pattern, rhythm, unity, and variety. On the front of each handout there is information on different ways you can incorporate that principle into your artwork.The back of each worksheet has an activity for the students to complete to test their understanding of the information on the front. I use these in my Introduction to Art classes, which are added to their art notebooks and checked for daily grades at the end of the semester. Now that I have two versions of the elements and principles worksheets, I plan to use one set in my Intro class and one set used as a reminder for an upper level course.

These sheets were created for grades 4th-12th grade. Some have more complex ideas, and may not be suitable for younger than 4th. I would encourage use of these in levels as high as AP art, when the elements and principles are one of the bases for grading the portfolios.

I loved making each of these. Each were inspired by a piece of my life or a simple occurrence at the time I was designing them. My emphasis worksheet is an obvious reflection of my love for chickens. My repetition and pattern worksheet was created on a very rainy day while I was vacationing at Smith Lake in Alabama, which inspired the cloud and water design.

If you haven’t checked out products on Teachers Pay Teachers yet, I strongly encourage it. There are some amazing, creative teachers out there and you are helping to support another person directly involved in education. It has also helped me become a better teacher because I find myself cleaning up my lesson plans and PowerPoints to make them better sellers, and better teaching tools in my classroom.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! I recently did a major design overhaul, I hope you enjoy the cleaner look. Help me spread the word about my Teachers Pay Teachers products, and in turn help me expand my house to fit my expanding family, by sharing this post with others. Thanks for stopping by!


 

Elements of Art Worksheet Pack + TPT Sale

For the last three years, my best seller on my Teachers Pay Teachers website has been my hand drawn elements of art worksheet pack. I spent the summer of 2014 drawing out my elements of art, principles of design, and visual journal how to worksheets. I carefully drew them in pencil, spell checked, had my husband spell check, and finally traced over everything in sharpie. Next, everything was scanned in, edited, and uploaded to my store. Hours went into that product, but it has certainly paid off.

I have gotten a lot of great feedback and constructive criticism on my product. The biggest issue that has come up over the years is the legibility of my sheets. For the most part, they are fairly clear, but there are a few spots where text is squeezed in. In addition, students these days are more used to reading text off a screen than handwriting on a sheet of paper.

While I enjoy the handmade aspect of these products, I decided it was time to bring them up to the modern era. Over Christmas break I began digitally redesigning all of my element of art worksheets. This task proved more difficult than I expected. I not only wanted to give it a more legible look, but I also wanted to maintain a modern feel, and provide new information. For example, if my customers wanted to review the elements of art in their painting class, they could get an entire new set of worksheets to use in their classroom. I thought this would be fairly easy, but there is only so many ways you can explain value.

Once again hours were spent creating these new products, and finally, last night I uploaded the compilation pack of the seven worksheets. I love the new look and I am proud of the fact that the information was presented in a new way. A lot of the same things are covered, but with different explanations, examples, and applications. 

Like my original set, this pack includes the elements of art: color, line, shape, form, texture, value, and space. Each worksheet includes a color and black and white version of the front, and a back that tests the students’ understanding of the information on the front. These are great activities to get the students thinking about the elements and putting information to practice before final projects.

In addition to finally finished my updated elements of art worksheets, I am participating in the Teachers Pay Teachers end of school year sale. My entire store will be 20% off tomorrow (5/9/17) through Wednesday (5/10/17). That puts this pack at just $8.00.

If you haven’t checked out Teachers Pay Teachers yet, give it a try. There is nothing better than finding great resources for your classroom and supporting your fellow educators at the same time. The majority of my profits from my store go straight to my pocket, TPT only takes a small percentage, making all my time and effort well worth it.

We are almost there, summer is just around the corner.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about art education, teachers pay teachers, visual journaling, and crafting in general by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by.


 

Teachers Pay Teachers Site Wide Sale: 20% off

Teachers Pay Teachers has become a more amazing opportunity than I ever thought possible. In less than 6 weeks hub and I will be on our way to Europe. We are headed to Munich, Berlin, and Amsterdam for a nine day tour, paid for in full by my fall Teachers Pay Teachers earnings. Not only am I proud of myself for this accomplishment, but I am incredibly grateful to all of my fellow teachers who have purchased my products. It’s the easiest thing to start doing. I simply take the lesson plans, PowerPoints, and worksheets I already spend time making for my classes, and upload them to TPT. You literally set it and forget it. Jumping on this bandwagon three years ago has created some amazing opportunities for me.

Teachers Pay Teachers is hosting a site wide sale starting tomorrow, 2/7/17, running through Wednesday, 2/8/17. I will be running 20% off all my products, which is huge if you have recently checked out my most expensive product, a year long. everything you need for every single day, Intro to Art pack for $75.00, marked down to $60.00.

I have also been busy posting some new items the last few weeks. Check out my shop here and details below!

My most recent product is one of my favorites, a “Save the Brushes” poster reminding students how to properly clean brushes. The photograph in the background are actual brushes my students have killed in the last year. Check out the poster and more details here.

I finally compiled all of my visual journal teaching tools into one bundle pack. This makes it cheaper and easier to get everything you need to introduce and maintain this project through multiple classes and levels of art courses. Check it out here.

Right now my team of Literary Magazine students are working on compiling all of our art and writing submissions into our annual magazine. I decided after putting together my multiple how to handouts, that this could be a good resource for teachers new to the Literary Magazine world. Check it out here.

After the success of my hand drawn Elements of Art and Principles of Design worksheets, I decided to make digital versions of them. This gives another version for teachers who have already tried my product to use in their classes, and a cleaner version for those who like this look better. I have already uploaded color, shape, line, and form, and am working on the remaining elements. Once they are all done I will bundle them for $10.00 for all seven worksheets, the same price as my hand drawn set. The Principles of Design will be next, be on the lookout in the coming months.

I have been working hard at my second job, adding to my TPT store. Although lately I have been spending most evenings creating and uploading products, once they are uploaded they can be continuously downloaded by shoppers without you needing to do anything. I am highly motivated at this point, I need spending money for my European vacation!

Thanks for all the support and for checking out my blog! Help me spread the word about art projects, Teachers Pay Teachers, visual journals, and art in general by sharing with others. Thanks for stopping by!