Tag: visual art

Teachers Pay Teachers: Semester Long Painting Curriculum and Yearlong Advanced Art Curriculum

I have been posting a lot about Teachers Pay Teachers lately, but lately TPT has been my life. For another summer in a row, I have spent all summer planning, typing, and compiling lesson plans, PowerPoints, worksheets, and resources into new TPT products. Last year, my August and September earnings funded a ten day trip that took my hubs and I to Munich, Berlin, and Amsterdam. This year, my August earnings have more than doubled, and my hard earned money is being put into our front yard landscaping, replacing molding around windows, and repairing our roof. Although these are less fun items than a European vacation, they are all in preparation for our next bundle of joy, baby girl Panetta, due November 27th. These things have all been possible because I decided to start putting a few of my lesson plans on a teaching website.


One major goal I have for myself is to create an entire high school art (adaptable to middle school art) curriculum. This would include yearlong and semester long curriculums for Introduction to Art, Painting, Drawing, Advanced 2D Design, Introduction to Sculpture and Ceramics, Sculpture and Ceramics II, Advanced 3D Design, and Advanced Placement Art. Last summer, I compiled my yearlong and semester long lessons for Introduction to Art. It has been my biggest seller the last year. This summer I was able to compile my semester long painting curriculum and my advanced 2D art (which is also adaptable for AP Art breadth) curriculums. They are both doing well, and I am getting a lot of great feedback. I am halfway through my Introduction to Sculpture and Ceramics curriculum, and can’t wait to tie everything up in a nice bow and get it posted to my Teachers Pay Teachers store. I hope by this time next year my high school art curriculum will be complete, and I will be onto my next TPT task.

My painting curriculum includes:

-Semester long timeline
-Supply list
-Syllabus
-Get to Know you handout
-10 student handouts
-1 teacher aid handouts
-2 technology tie activities
-9 lesson plans
-12 PowerPoints
-6 rubrics
-5 grading checklists
-5 critique sheets

The lessons cover the three main types of paint: watercolor, acrylic, and oil (oil can be substituted for art teachers on a budget), as well as mixed media with the visual journal project I incorporate in every class.

With this curriculum students create a sketchbook, full of painting techniques, testers, and reference material, as well as 5 take home level paintings, and a visual journal book. With every curriculum bundle I include a timeline, so you know what to teach when and how long it will take, as well as a supply list.

My Advanced 2D Design art curriculum includes:

In all this art unit includes:
-Course Syllabus
-Tell Me About You worksheet
-Yearlong timeline
-Supply list for all 14 projects
-2017 August-December calendar for AP breadth adaption
-14 completed projects
-10 Lesson plans
-9 PowerPoints
-4 handouts
-2 printable posters
-9 sketchbook handouts
-8 critique sheets
-10 project rubrics

This class is a full year course and is the last art class before students take Advanced Placement (AP) Art. It helps prepare them for the rigor of AP and they create work that is AP quality they can use in their portfolio. They create artwork using a range of materials: pencil, charcoal, watercolor, acrylic paint, oil paint, and mixed media, and participate in many group discussion and critiques. This curriculum also includes a timeline to adapt this to a semester long course, to fulfill the AP Art breadth section of the portfolio. I also have a printable 2017-2018 calendar as a resources for AP Art students.

I am really proud of all the work I have put into my TPT store, and even more proud when my work literally pays off. I you haven’t yet, check out all the amazing things TPT sellers have to offer! Support a fellow educator and get so many great resources for your classroom.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! Help me spread the word about art, TPT, crafting, and all things creating on your preferred social media site. Thanks for stopping by!


 

Teachers Pay Teachers: Principles of Design Worksheet Pack

So far this summer I have enjoyed a break from my normal teaching schedule, a trip to South Africa, Hilton Head Island, Smith Lake, and I’ve been getting extra snuggles from my little man Cooper. In addition to traveling and snuggling, I have also been working hard to get new items posted on Teachers Pay Teachers. Last year my August and September earnings from the website funded a trip to Europe for my husband and I. This year, and for the foreseeable future, I hope to save my earnings for a home renovation. It’s a big goal I have set for myself, but I am confident with a lot of hard work I can get there.

My last post, over two months ago {whoops} focused on one of my newest Teacher Pay Teacher products, a revamp of my hand drawn elements of art worksheets. Today, I finally got my final worksheet of my principles of design pack added to the website. Check it out here.

This pack includes eight worksheets. Each worksheet focuses on a different principle of design. I created worksheets for balance, emphasis, movement, proportion, repetition and pattern, rhythm, unity, and variety. On the front of each handout there is information on different ways you can incorporate that principle into your artwork.The back of each worksheet has an activity for the students to complete to test their understanding of the information on the front. I use these in my Introduction to Art classes, which are added to their art notebooks and checked for daily grades at the end of the semester. Now that I have two versions of the elements and principles worksheets, I plan to use one set in my Intro class and one set used as a reminder for an upper level course.

These sheets were created for grades 4th-12th grade. Some have more complex ideas, and may not be suitable for younger than 4th. I would encourage use of these in levels as high as AP art, when the elements and principles are one of the bases for grading the portfolios.

I loved making each of these. Each were inspired by a piece of my life or a simple occurrence at the time I was designing them. My emphasis worksheet is an obvious reflection of my love for chickens. My repetition and pattern worksheet was created on a very rainy day while I was vacationing at Smith Lake in Alabama, which inspired the cloud and water design.

If you haven’t checked out products on Teachers Pay Teachers yet, I strongly encourage it. There are some amazing, creative teachers out there and you are helping to support another person directly involved in education. It has also helped me become a better teacher because I find myself cleaning up my lesson plans and PowerPoints to make them better sellers, and better teaching tools in my classroom.

Thanks for taking the time to check out my blog! I recently did a major design overhaul, I hope you enjoy the cleaner look. Help me spread the word about my Teachers Pay Teachers products, and in turn help me expand my house to fit my expanding family, by sharing this post with others. Thanks for stopping by!


 

Mixed Media Vs. Multimedia : Making A Distinction by Alison Lansky

 

 

There are so many different styles of art that it is easy to get some of them confused with others, especially if they have similar names. One area where there seems to be a great deal of confusion is in distinguishing between mixed media art and multimedia art. They do sound similar and it is common for people to assume that these terms both refer to the same type of artwork. However, there are some very clear distinctions that set these apart. When you understand these distinctions it becomes clear that the two are actually very different!

What Is Mixed Media Art?

Mixed media art is a type of visual art which incorporates various different types of art media. For example, a canvas which combines paint, ink and collage techniques could be considered to be mixed media artwork. Similarly, a sculpture constructed from clay with other materials embedded would also be considered mixed media. In short, mixed media is artwork which uses more than one medium in its creation. The image below shows Kyle Boganwright’s ‘Whale’ which is a good example of mixed media art as it incorporates pen, ink and watercolor paint in its composition. If you are looking for more examples of mixed media art, then you can look out for books about the topic. There is a great selection available from www.jacksonsart.com including ‘Exhibition 36: A Gallery of Mixed Media Inspiration’ by Susan Tuttle which is a personal favorite of mine.

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What Is Multimedia Art?

On the other hand, multimedia artwork covers a far broader spectrum. Often the term relates to art installations which combine both audio and visual components. This might include merging drama, dance, film, graphics, music and even interactive elements.

Often multimedia art galleries will display artwork with lighting and sound incorporated in the display to give viewers the complete multi-sensory effect.

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Key Differences Between Mixed Media & Multimedia

In order to separate these two postmodern art forms, the key difference is that mixed media art covers all forms of visual art (sculpture, painting, drawing etc.) which incorporates two or more mediums. This is often done by layering materials to create more interesting textures. However, multimedia not only incorporates these visual arts, but also additional audio visual elements and also other arts such as literature, drama and dance. Multimedia is by its very definition the broader of the two while mixed media art has more limitation.

Examples of Mixed Media Art

Once you understand what mixed media art actually is you may start to notice many different examples of it in everyday life. Like all art, it is all about freedom to express yourself so examples of mixed media art are varied. Some of the common examples that you may have noticed include some greeting cards which are often created using scrapbooking techniques where the main painted or drawn image is embellished with other materials such as glitter, ribbons and other types of decoration.

Another popular form of mixed media artwork is the artist trading card (ATC). These small 2.5 inch by 3.5 inch cards art not exclusively mixed media, but it is a popular technique which many artists use to create tiny pieces of art which are swapped or traded with other artists.

In conclusion, the easiest way to tell the difference between mixed media and multimedia is to keep in mind that mixed media art will combine two or more forms of visual art whereas multimedia art will combine visual art with audio visual elements and even elements of other art forms includings literature, drama and dance.

 

–Alison Lansky is a mother of two great kids and loves to blog on a variety of topics which catch her interest including art, parenting and family.

A big thank you to Alison for sending me this interesting and informative article. I would also like to extend a big thank you to you, for checking out my blog. Help me spread the word by sharing it with others, thanks for stopping by!


 

“Whale” image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kylebgalleries/4317292826/in/photolist-7zvfKd-bfZGXM-9A258y

Multimedia image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremyschulz/2897028170